Credentials and Licensure

 

Licensed Physician, Osteopathic Medical Board of California


Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

DEA Certification, U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency


Graduate of the Harbor UCLA Psychiatry Residency Training Program


Graduate of Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine


Couples and Sex Therapist Certified by the American Association of Couples and Sex Therapists through Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA 


Member of the American Psychiatric Association


Member of the Southern California Psychiatric Society


Member of the American Association of Couples and Sex Therapists


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What is the difference between a d.o. and an m.d.?

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About D.O.s

You may not be aware that there are two types of complete physicians in the United States. A doctor of osteopathic medicine (D.O.) is a fully trained and licensed  doctor who has attended and graduated from a U.S. osteopathic medical  school. A doctor of medicine (M.D.) has attended and graduated from a  conventional medical school. 

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D.O.s and M.D.s are alike in many ways:

  • Both D.O. and M.D. medical schools are 4 years long and require the MCAT entrance exam after a 4 year Bachelors degree. 
  • After medical school D.O.s and M.D.s train side by side in hospital internships, residency programs, and fellowships. 
  • D.O.s and M.D.s are licensed through their respective state medical boards 
  • Both D.O.s and M.D.s can choose to practice in any specialty of medicine such as pediatrics, neurology, surgery, radiology, or anesthesiology.  They take the same specialty board exams and are certified by the same specialty board in their chosen field. 

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Osteopathic Approach

D.O.s are trained with an emphasis on prevention. The goal is to look beyond the specific presenting symptom and treat the person as a whole. This concept is especially relevant to psychiatry as our mental health depends on a multitude of interwoven factors like nutrition, exercise, sleep, stress level, environment, relationships, community, and patterns of thinking and behaving.